Was the Bible Written to Me? A Bothersome Question.

Let’s be clear to who and what the “Me” (Don) is referring:

  • 1st World
  • American
  • Male
  • Affluent
  • Caucasian/Anglo
  • Straight
  • Educated
  • Able Bodied

I’m certain we could add to that list…but what this list does indeed point to is a great deal of privilege, power, and control over my environment.

Was the bible written to a people of privilege?
Was the bible written to a people in power?
Was the bible written to a people in control of their environment?

It was not! This isn’t even debatable. The bible was written to a people who historically experienced the exact opposite identifiers.

So what’s the danger of assuming the bible is written to me?

Continue reading “Was the Bible Written to Me? A Bothersome Question.”

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Must be nice…

You’re probably familiar with this phrase or some close derivative of it:

  • x,y,z never happens to me…
  • I’d do anything to have something like this…
  • Wish I were so lucky…
  • I never win/get anything…

I’m sure you could add several other ones to this list. We’re all guilty of these types of responses and have been the recipient of them as well.

 

With social media taking the place of so many other forms of communications these types of statements seem to be on the rise. I think it is due to a couple of things. First, we’ve become much like the ancient Egyptians where we only record our victories (successes and positives) as opposed to a balanced view of our personal history/story. Secondly, when we encounter our social media threads we find ourself envious of the ideal life that we’ve pieced together from all the ‘great‘ things happening in everyone’s lives around us.

What would it look like if our first responses to good news for others was NOT to compare our own situation but instead to celebrate the favor that they’ve gained?

Our behavior on social media often reminds me a bit of a biblical story of ‘The Prodigal Son‘ where the one brother returns and the other’s response is something along the lines of, “but I never get to…” When we insert ourselves into these moments for other people we’re often guilty of stealing some of the joy, redemption, happiness that they were to receive. Just imagine if the older brother’s response would’ve been to contribute to the party and celebration as opposed to detracting from the moment?

So let’s challenge one another to celebrate the good that befalls our neighbor, cherish the moments of success of our friends, heap gladness onto the fortune of our family members. Let’s learn to bask in the glow of each others joy.

 

When following Jesus looks different than Christianity (pt. 1)

Jesus dancing

An Article just went viral (surprise surprise) about a community that is trying to create a separate prom that won’t allow gay students to attend.

WHAT?!?!?

I am not going to debate the theology that surrounds our friends in the LGBTQ community, as I know plenty of Christians on both sides of the proverbial aisle: those who DO believe homosexuality is a sin, and those who do not. However, it seems that for the most part instances of exclusion, discrimination, or outright hatred toward the LGBTQ community seem to arise from those who DO view homosexuality as a sin; therefore, what I want to address is what is seemingly anti-Jesus behavior coming from these folks.

Let me tell you a story (for those who feel that the LGBTQ community are “sinners”):

As Jesus went on from there, he saw a man named Matthew sitting at the prom ticket booth. “Follow me,” he told him, and Matthew got up and followed him.

While Jesus was dancing at prom, many gay, lesbian, transgendered and queers came and danced with him and his disciples. When the “Christians” saw this, they asked his disciples, “Why does your teacher dance with gay, lesbian, transgendered and queers?”…

For my friends that don’t view the LGBTQ community as “sinners” (at least not for their sexuality) – the notion that their Christian faith is demonstrated, in the manner in the article, is heart wrenching.

I fear that we are at a place where we need to have honest discussions about this. If you are in the camp that holds homosexuality as a sin then please follow Jesus’ examples of how to treat the folks you think are missing the mark – don’t wind up in the same camp as many of the Pharisees in this particular situation above (Matthew 9.10-12). If you are in the camp that accepts homosexuality please follow Jesus’ examples of how to love those that disagree with you as well!

Article (as referenced above)